A Bit of Dirt – Fall 2007

The full pdf copy of this edition is available here.

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE
By Glenn Parsons
This morning I began to work in my garden before 9:00 am with the hope that I would avoid the oppressive heat and humidity. Unfortunately, my plan was unsuccessful. To make matters worse I was attacked by a formation of B-52’s, or should I say some very large Georgia mosquitoes! My garden is progressing slowly but seems to be handling the drought conditions fairly well. However, the outlook for the rest of August and the entire month of September is not good. Have you noticed that even against all adversity the weeds continue to thrive?

I am trying a few members of the Agastache species in the hummingbird garden this year. There are about four-color varieties with tubular flowers, which hummingbirds cannot resist. In fact, one common name for these plants is Hummingbird Mint. Agastache species have a long blooming period and should be great for the hummer’s late summer migration. I am sure many of you have been growing one or more of this plant variety for years. I have had one more gardening related success that was a surprise. Remember the two gentlemen who spoke to us about their birdhouses and feeders? Well, I purchased one of their large “fly-through” feeders and placed it in the backyard according to instructions. After about one month, there are routinely fourteen species of birds visiting that feeder. This is very pleasing indeed.

Before closing I want to let you all know that the Gwinnett County Master Gardeners Association is doing very well. We have had a very successful year at fund raising. Our membership is active and attendance at our monthly meetings continues to increase. There are ample funds available for qualifying community projects that have been challenged this year by  the ongoing drought. This month your elected officers and I will be working on revisions to our Constitution and By-laws in an effort to ensure we remain a strong and well-organized group. All things considered, the “State of the Garden” is healthy and growing.

Other articles in this issue:
The Winter Garden Planning and Planting for the Southeast – Book Review – By Marlene Gillman
ST. AUSGUSTINE GRASS – By Robert Brannen
Mycorrhizas: The Underground Internet – By Dan Willis